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Interlake-Eastern Regional Health Authority is now at a point that we can resume emergency departmentservice effective 8 a.m., Monday, January 16, 2023. Pine Falls Health Complex’s emergency departmentservice has been suspended for months due to a shortage of qualified/experienced ED nurses. The national, provincial and regional health care professional staff shortage remains a critical service challenge across all programs. 

The work to stabilize the health complex’s emergency department staffing continues. There are periodic gaps in staffing coverage that we continue to pursue every option to fill. While these staffing efforts are top priority and we are doing our best, we may not be able to commit to fill every staffing schedule gap.

The target schedule upon reopening is for 7 days per week, 24 hour/day service. When we cannot fill a staffing vacancy, we will place the emergency departmenton diversion for the safety of the patients served. 

To find emergency department schedules for hospitals in Interlake-Eastern Regional Health Authority, including Pine Falls Health Complex, please visit ierha.ca and click on the “Emergency Dept. Schedules” button on the top right of the page. As an alternative, you can also listen to a recording of emergency department status by calling 1-866-267-5818. In the event that you experience a diversion at Pine Falls Health Complex emergency department, please visit the nearest open emergency department.

Starting Monday, January 16, 2023, the Pine Falls Primary Care Clinic is open Mon. to Fri. from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The services of the extended hours/after regular hours primary care clinic conclude with the re-opening of the emergency department, as care providers will now be working in the emergency department. If your care needs do not require emergency care, please come and see us in the primary care clinic. Please call 204- 367-2278 for an appointment.

As always, in the event of a medical emergency, please call 911 or your local number for health emergencies. Interlake-Eastern RHA has advised our partners at Shared Health Emergency Response Services of the date for the re-opening of the emergency department.

We will work to advise the public as quickly as possible of any changes in emergency department service at Pine Falls Health Complex. Please like us on Facebook and monitor our emergency department status webpage or call 1-866-267-5818.

We remain committed to the long-term, stable delivery of emergency department services in Pine Falls Health Complex to address the needs of communities served. 

An early morning drive from Arborg area to Selkirk through thick ice fog has ended with the first birth of the year at Selkirk Regional Health Centre in Interlake-Eastern Regional Health Authority.

Wanda and Samuel Wipf welcomed their fifth child, Zachary Don, at 9:05 a.m. on Wednesday, January 4.

He weighed 6 lbs,, 11 oz and is 21.5” long.

“He’s the smallest one yet,” said Wanda, comparing him to his siblings Noah, 9; Logan, 7; Lindsay, 6; and Jackson, 3.

Zachary will be welcomed with open arms by his brothers and sister who are at home with their grandma at Broad Valley Colony.

“We sent them a picture this morning and apparently they are hitting the ceiling,” said Samuel.

The birth was attended by Dr. Margaret Speer. This was Wanda’s fourth birth at Selkirk Regional Health Centre where she says she has always been treated very good. The couple said everyone is very helpful and they have always been  welcomed at the health centre.

During their stay in the obstetrics unit, Betty Milkowski, president of the Selkirk Regional Health Centre’s Ladies Auxiliary, visited the Wipf family to celebrate Zachary’s arrival. She presented them with a new play pen, diapers, sleepers and toys on behalf of the auxiliary.

“This is such a wonderful way for us to start the year,” said Milkowski.

Clinical team manager for the obstetrics unit, Jamie Brown, said they are pleased that the Wipf family has made Selkirk Regional Health Centre their preferred location for their deliveries.

“We are very proud of our obstetrics unit and the team that works to provide care. It is our pleasure to help families get off to a great start! For those who are interested, we do offer epidurals. We encourage anyone interested in delivering with us to call the health centre at 204-482-5800 to learn more and arrange a tour of the unit,” said Brown.

In 2022, there were 397 births at Selkirk Regional Health Centre which is Interlake-Eastern RHA’s birthing centre.

Parents Wanda and Samuel Wipf of the Arborg area hold their newborn baby boy, Zachary.

Eriksdale hospital open for admissions, ED services slated to resume next month

Interlake-Eastern RHA reminds residents that Eriksdale’s 13-bed E.M. Crowe Hospital remains open for inpatient admissions, the community’s two physicians continue to see patients five days per week at Eriksdale Clinic and plans are on track to reopen the community’s emergency department next month.

Read more from Shared Health here: Eriksdale hospital open for admissions, emergency department services slated to resume next month – Shared Health (sharedhealthmb.ca)

Pine Falls Primary Care Clinic CLOSED Sun., Dec. 4 due to unexpected illness.

Please call Selkirk’s Quick Care Clinic for a same day appointment.
Phones answered at 9:30 a.m.
204-482-4399
In the event of a medical emergency, call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number.
We apologize for this inconvenience.

Virtual memory trees offer a place to mourn loss of loved ones

This year, Interlake-Eastern RHA’s palliative care program is providing a number of ways to honour people who have passed away.

To submit your virtual memory tree submission, click here.

Messages submitted will be posted on the virtual memory tree webpage. 

Lifelong friends launch nursing careers in Ashern

A pair of lifelong friends has already marked many milestones over the years and they’ve just embarked on a new adventure together — a career in nursing.

Kaylee Smith and Taylor Buors, who grew up together in St. Laurent, both completed their first day as full-time nurses at Ashern Hospital on Sept. 12. Although they’ve ended up on the same career path, they took different routes to arrive at their destination.

Smith, a registered nurse, graduated in October from the bachelor of nursing program at the University of Manitoba. But her journey started even earlier with summer employment as a health-care aide at Stonewall Hospital.

“Here I was able to hone some of my clinical and professional skills,” she said. “I also met some of the most helpful and kind health-care professionals who took the time to teach me how to care for patients at the bedside.”

Then for her internship, Smith gained experience in primary care throughout the region.

“In this position, I was able to work within my home community of St. Laurent where I got to better understand the challenges in delivery of primary care to an underserved community and how the health-care team works so hard to provide the best care possible, including prioritizing the French language program,” she said.

“I also had the privilege of experiencing the leadership side of primary care. It gave me an appreciation of how hard our leadership teams work to serve our communities in the best possible way.”

Smith expressed gratitude for these foundational work experiences, as well as for resources that helped along the way, such as the Home for the Summer program offered by Interlake-Eastern Regional Health Authority.

“I also had the opportunity to work as a health-care aide full-time for several summers through generous funding from the Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) in collaboration with Indigenous Human Resources at IERHA. The Grow Your Own Bursary program was essential for funding my education but also in ensuring that I would work within my communities and give back some day,” she said.

“These resources were so impactful throughout my education in preparing me for my career every step of the way. I was able to gain valuable clinical and leadership experiences as a student through the various positions, and the funding allowed me to worry less about tuition and more about focusing on my courses and eventually giving back to my communities.”

Looking back, Smith always knew she wanted to work in health care but was particularly drawn to nursing.

“Nursing is very hands-on and you get to be personable with patients and clients,” she said.

“There is also so much opportunity for growth, whether that be moving into leadership or there is always an opportunity to continue learning as you move into different fields of nursing.”

At the same time, she is also grateful for the chance to work in the Interlake.

“As a new nurse, I wanted the feeling of working close to home while still gaining a wide variety of clinical experiences. Here at Ashern, I get the opportunity to work closely with a large Indigenous population and serve the surrounding communities, including my own,” said Smith, who now lives in Eriksdale.

“I feel proud to be a part of the growing number of Indigenous health-care professionals within our region and to feel supported.”

Similar to Smith, Buors always knew she wanted to pursue a career that would allow her to make a positive impact on other people’s lives.

“Nursing is a profession where you are able to do that every day — this is what initially drew me to the career. I enjoy nursing because you get to meet people from all walks of life and are able to be there and help them during a time of need,” said Buors, who graduated in June from the University College of the North in Selkirk.

“In addition, I like that it is very hands-on and that every day brings a new challenge. I like that there is so much opportunity for continuous learning and growth within the profession.”

Ashern Hospital is already familiar ground for Buors, who completed a three-month senior practicum placement there, with the majority of her shifts in the emergency room.

“This is integral to me as a new nurse because I am able to continue to enhance my clinical knowledge, critical thinking skills and gain more hands-on experience, all while being in a rural hospital close to home. Working at Ashern Hospital gives me the opportunity to provide health care to a large Indigenous population and many surrounding communities within the Interlake-Eastern region, including my own,” said Buors, who continues to reside in St. Laurent.

“It felt really good to obtain full-time permanent employment within the IERHA as a new grad nurse. I am proud to work at a hospital that serves so many communities within the Interlake-Eastern region.”

In addition, Buors expressed gratitude for the help she received from the Manitoba Métis Federation throughout her post-secondary education.

“The MMF partnered with the University College of the North to deliver the nursing program in Selkirk. They funded myself and 13 other Métis students throughout the entirety of the program. This resource meant a lot to me and was crucial during my education, as it allowed me to focus solely on my studies and excel within the program,” she said.

“I strongly encourage others to utilize available programs and funding that is offered to post-secondary students pursuing a career in health care. All of the support that is out there truly helps in being successful throughout your program and chosen career path.”

Adding to the excitement of embarking on her new career, Buors is energized by the opportunity to work with her long-time friend.

“It feels great to work in the same hospital as Kaylee, especially since we grew up together. I feel proud to work alongside her since we share similar values to provide holistic, ethical and compassionate care to our patients,” she said.

“It is also nice to have someone that is new to the profession that I can go to for support, especially with all the challenges working in health care brings.”

Similarly, Smith shared her excitement about starting her nursing career alongside Buors.

“It feels amazing that even though we took different paths after high school, we still ended up in the same career — let alone at the same facility,” she said.

“I’m glad I have a friend, a colleague and a carpool buddy to share these new experiences with as we begin our careers.”

Opportunities for nursing education in the Interlake

Tanya Cheetham, chief nursing officer and regional lead for acute care and public health for Interlake-Eastern RHA, draws attention to opportunities in the Interlake to obtain nursing education close to home.

The recent Assiniboine Community College course in Arborg, held in conjunction with Fieldstone Ventures and IERHA, brought 25 nursing students to the region.

“They were able to complete their senior practicums — and for those who reside in the region, they were able to obtain positions in their communities, whether it was acute care, home care, long-term care or dialysis,” Cheetham said.

“To date, IERHA has hired 16 students from the Arborg program. We have also hired two licensed practical nurses students from the University College of the North program and six registered nurses from either University of Manitoba or Red River College.”

A recent communication from the University of Manitoba suggests that 86 per cent of students obtain employment where they have completed their senior practicums, she added.

“Evidence indicates that people never know something as thoroughly as when they have to coach or teach others; therefore, having students in the work environment strengthens the knowledge and professionalism of the existing workforce. Coaching and mentoring junior staff and students is a professional expectation of all nurses by their regulatory bodies. We thank the nurses and care teams that welcomed students and supported them in their learning journey,” Cheetham said.

“We welcome nursing students to the IERHA and will provide safe environments that foster learning and growth. Once the students complete their practicums, we want them to begin their nursing careers in the IERHA.”

To learn more about education opportunities in health care, visit www.ierha.ca/careers.

Out of province surgical options

If you are currently waiting for surgery, you may be eligible for treatment outside of Manitoba.  The province has agreements in place with trusted health care providers for certain services. If you are willing to travel, you may be able to access the care you need sooner. To find out more, visit www.gov.mb.ca/health/dsrecovery/options.html and then fill out the e-form or email patientnav@gov.mb.ca.

Brochure

Time to book your flu shot!

Mark your calendars! It’s once again time to book your flu shot.

Public health will host more than 70 flu clinics in 42 different communities across the region this year. This year’s seasonal influenza campaign will start on Oct. 31 and continue through to Dec. 3.

Along with seasonal influenza, people who are eligible for their pneumococcal 23 vaccine can also schedule appointments through the provincial vaccine booking line at 1-844-626-8222 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday to Friday. You can also book online by visiting Home – #ProtectMB

You can find the flu clinic schedule at Flu Shots (ierha.ca)  

And, yes, you can get your COVID-19 shot at a flu clinic this year if you’re eligible.

COVID-19 vaccines will be available for people aged six months and up at flu clinics. Bivalent COVID-19 booster vaccines will be available to all adults. Bivalent means this vaccine has been developed to provide protection against two strains of COVID-19: the original strain of the virus and the omicron variant. You must have completed your primary vaccination series before receiving the bivalent booster vaccine.

Please note:

  • Limited. Appointments are welcome and encouraged.
  • You must wear a non-medical face mask to your appointment.
  • Please practise good hand-washing and social distancing.
  • Do not come to your appointment if you are experiencing flu-like symptoms.
  • Please come right at your appointment time to avoid congestion.
  • Bring your Manitoba Health Card and wear a short-sleeved shirt.

For more information on this year’s flu clinics, visit our Flu Shots (ierha.ca)

Interlake-Eastern RHA is pleased to present the 2021-2022 Annual Report.
      

September 30 has been designated the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, a federal statutory holiday in recognition of the tragic history and ongoing legacy of residential schools. The history of this day builds upon the important work of the Orange Shirt Society and the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report. It is a day to witness, recognize and honour Indigenous victims and survivors of the residential school legacy and inform further action in the spirit of reconciliation.
Across Manitoba we offer health care services on the original lands of First Nations, Inuit and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. We dedicate ourselves to collaborate in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in the spirit of reconciliation and to the creation of health care environments that are safe, accessible and equitable for the populations we serve.
      

Do you know someone interested in an exciting career in health care? If so, they may want to check out the Selkirk Community Health Office’s Home Care Job Fair on Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.  to learn more about a career in home care.

“Home care is about helping patients with the supports they need to stay in their homes safely as they age,’’ says Tricia Tyerman, clinical team manager for Selkirk home care. “The Home Care Job Fair offers an opportunity for interested people to learn more about home care and receive help applying for positions within the program.”

Home care services are provided by the regional health authorities in Manitoba to those who require health services and assistance with daily living. Home care will provide an initial review and assessment of patients’ individual needs to determine what services are needed. Resource co-ordinators help co-ordinate that service with clients and their families.

Home care resource co-ordinators share why they enjoy their jobs in home care.

“I like how the small actions we make have a big impact on clients. For example, us going once or twice a day could be the difference between them staying in their family home and having to move,” says Lauren Airey, home care resource co-ordinator.

Lorraine Lowen, another resource co-ordinator, says her reasons are very similar for why she enjoys working in home care.

“Working in home care is important to me because I enjoy working with people, and it gives me a sense of purpose to be able to help them stay in their home as long as possible.”

Interlake-Eastern RHA is hiring licensed practical nurses, health-care aides and uncertified health-care aides into the home care program.

To apply for positions, visit www.ierha.ca/careers and click “View/Apply for position.” On the job postings page, select “Community Care” under “Job Postings” to view home care positions.

For more information, contact Human Resources at hr@ierha.ca or Kerri Simcoe, human resources generalist, at ksimcoe@ierha.ca or 204-485-5436. More information is also available online at www.ierha.ca.

Please note, phone services back in service at East Gate Lodge Personal Care Home and the adjacent Stony Plains Terrace. Bell MTS identified and fixe the issue with one of their cables.

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